LABOUR MARKETS

Project

Women's Mobility Program

Women's Mobility Program

Large-scale evaluation study of the barriers to women’s labour force participation, and how they impact job seekers and employers in the labour market.

Project

Punjab Economic Opportunities Program (PEOP)

Punjab Economic Opportunities Program (PEOP)

To help alleviate poverty and vulnerability by augmenting the skills-base of low income, poor and vulnerable families through vocational training.

Project

Impact of Social Assistance on Early Childhood Development Among Ultra-Poor Households

Impact of Social Assistance on Early Childhood Development Among Ultra-Poor Households

To study how children’s development in early life is impacted by alternative forms of social protection programs.

Project

Market for Tutors Project

Market for Tutors Project

To inform interventions that may help expand the market for private tutoring and improve its efficacy by building on a survey of 21 private markets for tutors (15,000 households).

Project

Day Labour Project

Day Labour Project

The project studies the existing market structures that affect day laborer’s in Pakistan, focusing on easing search frictions and matching costs.

Women's Mobility Program

Principal Investigators:

Erica Field

Research Fellow
Erica Field is a Research Fellow at CERP. She is an Associate Professor of Economics at Duke University. Since receiving her PhD, she has worked at Princeton, Stanford, and Harvard, where she was a Professor for six years before joining Duke. Dr. Erica’s major fields of interest are development economics, labor economics, economic demography, and health. She has received grants from the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and IZA/DFID Growth and Labour Markets in Low-Income Countries, among others. She has published work in various journals, including the American Economics Journal and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. Dr. Erica’s research specifically focuses on the areas of marriage and family, property rights, global health, and finance and entrepreneurship. She is currently working on projects that explore adolescent empowerment and education in Bangladesh, the effects of micro-finance on women and households in South Asia and India, and the impacts of access to family planning resources on fertility and health in Zambia. She received her PhD and M.A. in Economics from Princeton University in 2003 and her B.A. in Economics and Latin American Studies from Vassar College in 1996.

Erica Field

Research Fellow
Erica Field is a Research Fellow at CERP. She is an Associate Professor of Economics at Duke University. Since receiving her PhD, she has worked at Princeton, Stanford, and Harvard, where she was a Professor for six years before joining Duke. Dr. Erica’s major fields of interest are development economics, labor economics, economic demography, and health. She has received grants from the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and IZA/DFID Growth and Labour Markets in Low-Income Countries, among others. She has published work in various journals, including the American Economics Journal and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. Dr. Erica’s research specifically focuses on the areas of marriage and family, property rights, global health, and finance and entrepreneurship. She is currently working on projects that explore adolescent empowerment and education in Bangladesh, the effects of micro-finance on women and households in South Asia and India, and the impacts of access to family planning resources on fertility and health in Zambia. She received her PhD and M.A. in Economics from Princeton University in 2003 and her B.A. in Economics and Latin American Studies from Vassar College in 1996.

Erica Field

Research Fellow
Erica Field is a Research Fellow at CERP. She is an Associate Professor of Economics at Duke University. Since receiving her PhD, she has worked at Princeton, Stanford, and Harvard, where she was a Professor for six years before joining Duke. Dr. Erica’s major fields of interest are development economics, labor economics, economic demography, and health. She has received grants from the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and IZA/DFID Growth and Labour Markets in Low-Income Countries, among others. She has published work in various journals, including the American Economics Journal and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. Dr. Erica’s research specifically focuses on the areas of marriage and family, property rights, global health, and finance and entrepreneurship. She is currently working on projects that explore adolescent empowerment and education in Bangladesh, the effects of micro-finance on women and households in South Asia and India, and the impacts of access to family planning resources on fertility and health in Zambia. She received her PhD and M.A. in Economics from Princeton University in 2003 and her B.A. in Economics and Latin American Studies from Vassar College in 1996.

Erica Field

Research Fellow
Erica Field is a Research Fellow at CERP. She is an Associate Professor of Economics at Duke University. Since receiving her PhD, she has worked at Princeton, Stanford, and Harvard, where she was a Professor for six years before joining Duke. Dr. Erica’s major fields of interest are development economics, labor economics, economic demography, and health. She has received grants from the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and IZA/DFID Growth and Labour Markets in Low-Income Countries, among others. She has published work in various journals, including the American Economics Journal and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. Dr. Erica’s research specifically focuses on the areas of marriage and family, property rights, global health, and finance and entrepreneurship. She is currently working on projects that explore adolescent empowerment and education in Bangladesh, the effects of micro-finance on women and households in South Asia and India, and the impacts of access to family planning resources on fertility and health in Zambia. She received her PhD and M.A. in Economics from Princeton University in 2003 and her B.A. in Economics and Latin American Studies from Vassar College in 1996.

Erica Field

Research Fellow
Erica Field is a Research Fellow at CERP. She is an Associate Professor of Economics at Duke University. Since receiving her PhD, she has worked at Princeton, Stanford, and Harvard, where she was a Professor for six years before joining Duke. Dr. Erica’s major fields of interest are development economics, labor economics, economic demography, and health. She has received grants from the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and IZA/DFID Growth and Labour Markets in Low-Income Countries, among others. She has published work in various journals, including the American Economics Journal and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. Dr. Erica’s research specifically focuses on the areas of marriage and family, property rights, global health, and finance and entrepreneurship. She is currently working on projects that explore adolescent empowerment and education in Bangladesh, the effects of micro-finance on women and households in South Asia and India, and the impacts of access to family planning resources on fertility and health in Zambia. She received her PhD and M.A. in Economics from Princeton University in 2003 and her B.A. in Economics and Latin American Studies from Vassar College in 1996.

Erica Field

Research Fellow
Erica Field is a Research Fellow at CERP. She is an Associate Professor of Economics at Duke University. Since receiving her PhD, she has worked at Princeton, Stanford, and Harvard, where she was a Professor for six years before joining Duke. Dr. Erica’s major fields of interest are development economics, labor economics, economic demography, and health. She has received grants from the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and IZA/DFID Growth and Labour Markets in Low-Income Countries, among others. She has published work in various journals, including the American Economics Journal and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. Dr. Erica’s research specifically focuses on the areas of marriage and family, property rights, global health, and finance and entrepreneurship. She is currently working on projects that explore adolescent empowerment and education in Bangladesh, the effects of micro-finance on women and households in South Asia and India, and the impacts of access to family planning resources on fertility and health in Zambia. She received her PhD and M.A. in Economics from Princeton University in 2003 and her B.A. in Economics and Latin American Studies from Vassar College in 1996.

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Kate Vyborny

Research Fellow
Kate Vyborny is a Research Fellow at CERP. She is a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Economics at Duke University, USA. Dr Kate is the associate director of the DevLab at Duke. Dr Kate’s research focuses on public service delivery, urban development and public transportation, and gender. She is a visiting faculty member at the Lahore School of Economics and the Lahore University of Management Sciences. Dr Kate has previously worked on development assistance effectiveness at the Center for Global Development, and on trade and development at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. She holds a D Phil (PhD) in economics from the University of Oxford, England, where she held the Rhodes Scholarship. She holds bachelor’s degrees in Economics and International Affairs from the University of Georgia, USA.

Kate Vyborny

Research Fellow
Kate Vyborny is a Research Fellow at CERP. She is a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Economics at Duke University, USA. Dr Kate is the associate director of the DevLab at Duke. Dr Kate’s research focuses on public service delivery, urban development and public transportation, and gender. She is a visiting faculty member at the Lahore School of Economics and the Lahore University of Management Sciences. Dr Kate has previously worked on development assistance effectiveness at the Center for Global Development, and on trade and development at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. She holds a D Phil (PhD) in economics from the University of Oxford, England, where she held the Rhodes Scholarship. She holds bachelor’s degrees in Economics and International Affairs from the University of Georgia, USA.

Kate Vyborny

Research Fellow
Kate Vyborny is a Research Fellow at CERP. She is a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Economics at Duke University, USA. Dr Kate is the associate director of the DevLab at Duke. Dr Kate’s research focuses on public service delivery, urban development and public transportation, and gender. She is a visiting faculty member at the Lahore School of Economics and the Lahore University of Management Sciences. Dr Kate has previously worked on development assistance effectiveness at the Center for Global Development, and on trade and development at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. She holds a D Phil (PhD) in economics from the University of Oxford, England, where she held the Rhodes Scholarship. She holds bachelor’s degrees in Economics and International Affairs from the University of Georgia, USA.

Kate Vyborny

Research Fellow
Kate Vyborny is a Research Fellow at CERP. She is a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Economics at Duke University, USA. Dr Kate is the associate director of the DevLab at Duke. Dr Kate’s research focuses on public service delivery, urban development and public transportation, and gender. She is a visiting faculty member at the Lahore School of Economics and the Lahore University of Management Sciences. Dr Kate has previously worked on development assistance effectiveness at the Center for Global Development, and on trade and development at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. She holds a D Phil (PhD) in economics from the University of Oxford, England, where she held the Rhodes Scholarship. She holds bachelor’s degrees in Economics and International Affairs from the University of Georgia, USA.

Kate Vyborny

Research Fellow
Kate Vyborny is a Research Fellow at CERP. She is a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Economics at Duke University, USA. Dr Kate is the associate director of the DevLab at Duke. Dr Kate’s research focuses on public service delivery, urban development and public transportation, and gender. She is a visiting faculty member at the Lahore School of Economics and the Lahore University of Management Sciences. Dr Kate has previously worked on development assistance effectiveness at the Center for Global Development, and on trade and development at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. She holds a D Phil (PhD) in economics from the University of Oxford, England, where she held the Rhodes Scholarship. She holds bachelor’s degrees in Economics and International Affairs from the University of Georgia, USA.

Kate Vyborny

Research Fellow
Kate Vyborny is a Research Fellow at CERP. She is a Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Economics at Duke University, USA. Dr Kate is the associate director of the DevLab at Duke. Dr Kate’s research focuses on public service delivery, urban development and public transportation, and gender. She is a visiting faculty member at the Lahore School of Economics and the Lahore University of Management Sciences. Dr Kate has previously worked on development assistance effectiveness at the Center for Global Development, and on trade and development at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. She holds a D Phil (PhD) in economics from the University of Oxford, England, where she held the Rhodes Scholarship. She holds bachelor’s degrees in Economics and International Affairs from the University of Georgia, USA.

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Robert Garlick

Principal Investigator
Robert Garlick is a Principal Investigator in the Women’s Mobility Program at CERP. Dr Robert joined the Economics department as an Assistant Professor in 2014. He previously worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the World Bank’s Development Research Group. Robert was born and raised in South Africa, where he studied Economics, Mathematics, and Philosophy at the University of Cape Town and managed a small education nonprofit. Dr Robert studies Education and Labor Economics in developing countries. He is currently working on Peer and Network Effects in Education, Determinants of Education Investments by Households, and Transitions between Education and the Labor market. This work spans empirical and methodological topics and includes primary data collection in and analysis of secondary data from Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa. Dr Robert holds a PhD in Economics and Public Policy from the University of Michigan.

Robert Garlick

Principal Investigator
Robert Garlick is a Principal Investigator in the Women’s Mobility Program at CERP. Dr Robert joined the Economics department as an Assistant Professor in 2014. He previously worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the World Bank’s Development Research Group. Robert was born and raised in South Africa, where he studied Economics, Mathematics, and Philosophy at the University of Cape Town and managed a small education nonprofit. Dr Robert studies Education and Labor Economics in developing countries. He is currently working on Peer and Network Effects in Education, Determinants of Education Investments by Households, and Transitions between Education and the Labor market. This work spans empirical and methodological topics and includes primary data collection in and analysis of secondary data from Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa. Dr Robert holds a PhD in Economics and Public Policy from the University of Michigan.

Robert Garlick

Principal Investigator
Robert Garlick is a Principal Investigator in the Women’s Mobility Program at CERP. Dr Robert joined the Economics department as an Assistant Professor in 2014. He previously worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the World Bank’s Development Research Group. Robert was born and raised in South Africa, where he studied Economics, Mathematics, and Philosophy at the University of Cape Town and managed a small education nonprofit. Dr Robert studies Education and Labor Economics in developing countries. He is currently working on Peer and Network Effects in Education, Determinants of Education Investments by Households, and Transitions between Education and the Labor market. This work spans empirical and methodological topics and includes primary data collection in and analysis of secondary data from Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa. Dr Robert holds a PhD in Economics and Public Policy from the University of Michigan.

Robert Garlick

Principal Investigator
Robert Garlick is a Principal Investigator in the Women’s Mobility Program at CERP. Dr Robert joined the Economics department as an Assistant Professor in 2014. He previously worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the World Bank’s Development Research Group. Robert was born and raised in South Africa, where he studied Economics, Mathematics, and Philosophy at the University of Cape Town and managed a small education nonprofit. Dr Robert studies Education and Labor Economics in developing countries. He is currently working on Peer and Network Effects in Education, Determinants of Education Investments by Households, and Transitions between Education and the Labor market. This work spans empirical and methodological topics and includes primary data collection in and analysis of secondary data from Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa. Dr Robert holds a PhD in Economics and Public Policy from the University of Michigan.

Robert Garlick

Principal Investigator
Robert Garlick is a Principal Investigator in the Women’s Mobility Program at CERP. Dr Robert joined the Economics department as an Assistant Professor in 2014. He previously worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the World Bank’s Development Research Group. Robert was born and raised in South Africa, where he studied Economics, Mathematics, and Philosophy at the University of Cape Town and managed a small education nonprofit. Dr Robert studies Education and Labor Economics in developing countries. He is currently working on Peer and Network Effects in Education, Determinants of Education Investments by Households, and Transitions between Education and the Labor market. This work spans empirical and methodological topics and includes primary data collection in and analysis of secondary data from Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa. Dr Robert holds a PhD in Economics and Public Policy from the University of Michigan.

Robert Garlick

Principal Investigator
Robert Garlick is a Principal Investigator in the Women’s Mobility Program at CERP. Dr Robert joined the Economics department as an Assistant Professor in 2014. He previously worked as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the World Bank’s Development Research Group. Robert was born and raised in South Africa, where he studied Economics, Mathematics, and Philosophy at the University of Cape Town and managed a small education nonprofit. Dr Robert studies Education and Labor Economics in developing countries. He is currently working on Peer and Network Effects in Education, Determinants of Education Investments by Households, and Transitions between Education and the Labor market. This work spans empirical and methodological topics and includes primary data collection in and analysis of secondary data from Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa. Dr Robert holds a PhD in Economics and Public Policy from the University of Michigan.

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Nivedhitha Subramanian

Principal Investigator and Graduate Student Fellow
Nivedhitha Subramanian is a Principal Investigator in Women’s Mobility Program at CERP. Dr Nivedhitha is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at Bates College. Her research interests are in Development and Labour Economics, with a focus on Gender. She completed her PhD in Public Policy (Economics Concentration) at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University in 2020.

Nivedhitha Subramanian

Principal Investigator and Graduate Student Fellow
Nivedhitha Subramanian is a Principal Investigator in Women’s Mobility Program at CERP. Dr Nivedhitha is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at Bates College. Her research interests are in Development and Labour Economics, with a focus on Gender. She completed her PhD in Public Policy (Economics Concentration) at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University in 2020.

Nivedhitha Subramanian

Principal Investigator and Graduate Student Fellow
Nivedhitha Subramanian is a Principal Investigator in Women’s Mobility Program at CERP. Dr Nivedhitha is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at Bates College. Her research interests are in Development and Labour Economics, with a focus on Gender. She completed her PhD in Public Policy (Economics Concentration) at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University in 2020.

Nivedhitha Subramanian

Principal Investigator and Graduate Student Fellow
Nivedhitha Subramanian is a Principal Investigator in Women’s Mobility Program at CERP. Dr Nivedhitha is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at Bates College. Her research interests are in Development and Labour Economics, with a focus on Gender. She completed her PhD in Public Policy (Economics Concentration) at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University in 2020.

Nivedhitha Subramanian

Principal Investigator and Graduate Student Fellow
Nivedhitha Subramanian is a Principal Investigator in Women’s Mobility Program at CERP. Dr Nivedhitha is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at Bates College. Her research interests are in Development and Labour Economics, with a focus on Gender. She completed her PhD in Public Policy (Economics Concentration) at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University in 2020.

Nivedhitha Subramanian

Principal Investigator and Graduate Student Fellow
Nivedhitha Subramanian is a Principal Investigator in Women’s Mobility Program at CERP. Dr Nivedhitha is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at Bates College. Her research interests are in Development and Labour Economics, with a focus on Gender. She completed her PhD in Public Policy (Economics Concentration) at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University in 2020.

According to International Labour Organisation, unemployed, underemployed, and economically inactive people are growing in low-income countries. In South Asian cities, women are considerably less likely to participate in the economy, even at high levels of education. Our data suggests that a large number of women may be inactive or “latent job seekers” who are at the margin of participation and lack information about relevant job opportunities. In this study we use our job matching platform, Job Talash to examine how various labour market interventions can improve the job search process for both employers and job seekers. Job Talash is an in-house, phone based job matching platform set up by researchers at CERP and Duke University. The platform connects job seekers to relevant job opportunities, in case their qualifications match with the requirements of the vacancies. The platform currently has over 10,000 jobseekers and 1,200 employers enrolled through a representative sample. The interventions on the platform include:

  • Safe pick and drop service.
  • Encouragement to apply through a phone call.
  • Auditing past experiences of job seekers.

We observe how these interventions impact job search outcomes such as application, interview and employment behaviour for both job seekers and employers. We particularly observe the impact on marginalized segments of the populations, such as women or inactive latent job seekers, who might lack access to relevant professional networks and internet services.

Date:

2014 – ongoing

Funding Partners:

DFID-IZA, NSF, J-PAL, IGC, ADB, DIV USAID, PEDL and IPA

Implementing Partner:

Punjab Social Welfare Department, Punjab Commission on the Status of Women (previously partnership), Punjab Social Welfare Department (previously a partner)

Publications

Research Papers:

Report:

Briefs

Media coverages

Videos

Web Portal: Job Asaan

Tags

Gender, Labour Markets, Informational Interventions, Phone-based Survey, CATI, CAPI

Punjab Economic Opportunities Program (PEOP)

Principal Investigators:

Asim Ijaz Khwaja

Co-Founder and Board Member
Asim Ijaz Khwaja is a Co-Founder and Board Member at CERP. He is the Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development, Professor of International Finance and Development at the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), and the Director at the Center for International Development (CID) at HKS. Professor Asim is the former Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design (EPOD) at Harvard Kennedy School. His areas of interest include economic development, finance, education, political economy, institutions, and contract theory/mechanism design. His research combines extensive fieldwork, rigorous empirical analysis, and microeconomic theory to answer questions that are motivated by and engage with policy. He has been published in leading economics journals, such as the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and has received coverage in numerous media outlets, such as The Economist, The New York Times, the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, Al-Jazeera, BBC and CNN. Professor Asim’s recent work ranges from understanding market failures in emerging financial markets to examining the private education market in low-income countries. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He also serves as the faculty co-chair of a week-long executive education programme, “Rethinking Financial Inclusion: Smart Design for Policy and Practice,” aimed primarily at professionals involved in the design and regulation of financial products and services for low-income populations. Professor Asim received a PhD in Economics from Harvard University and BS degrees in Economics and in Mathematics with Computer Science from MIT. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He was born in London, U.K., lived for eight years in Kano, Nigeria, the next eight in Lahore, Pakistan, and for the past several years in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He continues to enjoy interacting with people around the globe.

Asim Ijaz Khwaja

Co-Founder and Board Member
Asim Ijaz Khwaja is a Co-Founder and Board Member at CERP. He is the Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development, Professor of International Finance and Development at the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), and the Director at the Center for International Development (CID) at HKS. Professor Asim is the former Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design (EPOD) at Harvard Kennedy School. His areas of interest include economic development, finance, education, political economy, institutions, and contract theory/mechanism design. His research combines extensive fieldwork, rigorous empirical analysis, and microeconomic theory to answer questions that are motivated by and engage with policy. He has been published in leading economics journals, such as the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and has received coverage in numerous media outlets, such as The Economist, The New York Times, the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, Al-Jazeera, BBC and CNN. Professor Asim’s recent work ranges from understanding market failures in emerging financial markets to examining the private education market in low-income countries. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He also serves as the faculty co-chair of a week-long executive education programme, “Rethinking Financial Inclusion: Smart Design for Policy and Practice,” aimed primarily at professionals involved in the design and regulation of financial products and services for low-income populations. Professor Asim received a PhD in Economics from Harvard University and BS degrees in Economics and in Mathematics with Computer Science from MIT. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He was born in London, U.K., lived for eight years in Kano, Nigeria, the next eight in Lahore, Pakistan, and for the past several years in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He continues to enjoy interacting with people around the globe.

Asim Ijaz Khwaja

Co-Founder and Board Member
Asim Ijaz Khwaja is a Co-Founder and Board Member at CERP. He is the Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development, Professor of International Finance and Development at the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), and the Director at the Center for International Development (CID) at HKS. Professor Asim is the former Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design (EPOD) at Harvard Kennedy School. His areas of interest include economic development, finance, education, political economy, institutions, and contract theory/mechanism design. His research combines extensive fieldwork, rigorous empirical analysis, and microeconomic theory to answer questions that are motivated by and engage with policy. He has been published in leading economics journals, such as the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and has received coverage in numerous media outlets, such as The Economist, The New York Times, the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, Al-Jazeera, BBC and CNN. Professor Asim’s recent work ranges from understanding market failures in emerging financial markets to examining the private education market in low-income countries. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He also serves as the faculty co-chair of a week-long executive education programme, “Rethinking Financial Inclusion: Smart Design for Policy and Practice,” aimed primarily at professionals involved in the design and regulation of financial products and services for low-income populations. Professor Asim received a PhD in Economics from Harvard University and BS degrees in Economics and in Mathematics with Computer Science from MIT. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He was born in London, U.K., lived for eight years in Kano, Nigeria, the next eight in Lahore, Pakistan, and for the past several years in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He continues to enjoy interacting with people around the globe.

Asim Ijaz Khwaja

Co-Founder and Board Member
Asim Ijaz Khwaja is a Co-Founder and Board Member at CERP. He is the Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development, Professor of International Finance and Development at the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), and the Director at the Center for International Development (CID) at HKS. Professor Asim is the former Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design (EPOD) at Harvard Kennedy School. His areas of interest include economic development, finance, education, political economy, institutions, and contract theory/mechanism design. His research combines extensive fieldwork, rigorous empirical analysis, and microeconomic theory to answer questions that are motivated by and engage with policy. He has been published in leading economics journals, such as the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and has received coverage in numerous media outlets, such as The Economist, The New York Times, the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, Al-Jazeera, BBC and CNN. Professor Asim’s recent work ranges from understanding market failures in emerging financial markets to examining the private education market in low-income countries. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He also serves as the faculty co-chair of a week-long executive education programme, “Rethinking Financial Inclusion: Smart Design for Policy and Practice,” aimed primarily at professionals involved in the design and regulation of financial products and services for low-income populations. Professor Asim received a PhD in Economics from Harvard University and BS degrees in Economics and in Mathematics with Computer Science from MIT. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He was born in London, U.K., lived for eight years in Kano, Nigeria, the next eight in Lahore, Pakistan, and for the past several years in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He continues to enjoy interacting with people around the globe.

Asim Ijaz Khwaja

Co-Founder and Board Member
Asim Ijaz Khwaja is a Co-Founder and Board Member at CERP. He is the Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development, Professor of International Finance and Development at the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), and the Director at the Center for International Development (CID) at HKS. Professor Asim is the former Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design (EPOD) at Harvard Kennedy School. His areas of interest include economic development, finance, education, political economy, institutions, and contract theory/mechanism design. His research combines extensive fieldwork, rigorous empirical analysis, and microeconomic theory to answer questions that are motivated by and engage with policy. He has been published in leading economics journals, such as the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and has received coverage in numerous media outlets, such as The Economist, The New York Times, the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, Al-Jazeera, BBC and CNN. Professor Asim’s recent work ranges from understanding market failures in emerging financial markets to examining the private education market in low-income countries. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He also serves as the faculty co-chair of a week-long executive education programme, “Rethinking Financial Inclusion: Smart Design for Policy and Practice,” aimed primarily at professionals involved in the design and regulation of financial products and services for low-income populations. Professor Asim received a PhD in Economics from Harvard University and BS degrees in Economics and in Mathematics with Computer Science from MIT. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He was born in London, U.K., lived for eight years in Kano, Nigeria, the next eight in Lahore, Pakistan, and for the past several years in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He continues to enjoy interacting with people around the globe.

Asim Ijaz Khwaja

Co-Founder and Board Member
Asim Ijaz Khwaja is a Co-Founder and Board Member at CERP. He is the Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development, Professor of International Finance and Development at the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), and the Director at the Center for International Development (CID) at HKS. Professor Asim is the former Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design (EPOD) at Harvard Kennedy School. His areas of interest include economic development, finance, education, political economy, institutions, and contract theory/mechanism design. His research combines extensive fieldwork, rigorous empirical analysis, and microeconomic theory to answer questions that are motivated by and engage with policy. He has been published in leading economics journals, such as the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and has received coverage in numerous media outlets, such as The Economist, The New York Times, the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, Al-Jazeera, BBC and CNN. Professor Asim’s recent work ranges from understanding market failures in emerging financial markets to examining the private education market in low-income countries. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He also serves as the faculty co-chair of a week-long executive education programme, “Rethinking Financial Inclusion: Smart Design for Policy and Practice,” aimed primarily at professionals involved in the design and regulation of financial products and services for low-income populations. Professor Asim received a PhD in Economics from Harvard University and BS degrees in Economics and in Mathematics with Computer Science from MIT. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He was born in London, U.K., lived for eight years in Kano, Nigeria, the next eight in Lahore, Pakistan, and for the past several years in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He continues to enjoy interacting with people around the globe.

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Ali Cheema

Co-Founder and Board Member
Dr. Ali Cheema is a co-founder and board member at CERP. He serves as an associate professor of Economics and the faculty director of the Mahbub-ul-Haq Research Centre at the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS). Additionally, he holds the position of senior research fellow at the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). From 2004 to 2007, he also served as the head of the Economics Department at LUMS. Dr Ali possesses extensive experience in research and policy work, with a focus on political economy, governance, applied economics of crime and social protection, skills and the labor market. He was a member of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue (IPD) at Columbia University and served on the Taskforce on Decentralisation. Furthermore, he was one of the founding members of the award-winning portal Relief Information System for Earthquakes, Pakistan (RISEPAK). Dr Ali’s recent work includes conducting large-scale impact evaluations of vocational training programs aimed at poverty reduction in Punjab, as well as studying the relationship between criminal incidence and labor market outcomes in Pakistan. Dr Ali holds a Doctorate in Economics from the University of Cambridge, an MPhil in Economics and Politics of Development, a BA (Hons.) in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) from Oxford where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and a BA in Mathematics and Statistics from Government College, Lahore. In 2010-11, he had the privilege of being a visiting Fulbright and SAI Scholar at Harvard Kennedy School.

Ali Cheema

Co-Founder and Board Member
Dr. Ali Cheema is a co-founder and board member at CERP. He serves as an associate professor of Economics and the faculty director of the Mahbub-ul-Haq Research Centre at the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS). Additionally, he holds the position of senior research fellow at the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). From 2004 to 2007, he also served as the head of the Economics Department at LUMS. Dr Ali possesses extensive experience in research and policy work, with a focus on political economy, governance, applied economics of crime and social protection, skills and the labor market. He was a member of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue (IPD) at Columbia University and served on the Taskforce on Decentralisation. Furthermore, he was one of the founding members of the award-winning portal Relief Information System for Earthquakes, Pakistan (RISEPAK). Dr Ali’s recent work includes conducting large-scale impact evaluations of vocational training programs aimed at poverty reduction in Punjab, as well as studying the relationship between criminal incidence and labor market outcomes in Pakistan. Dr Ali holds a Doctorate in Economics from the University of Cambridge, an MPhil in Economics and Politics of Development, a BA (Hons.) in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) from Oxford where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and a BA in Mathematics and Statistics from Government College, Lahore. In 2010-11, he had the privilege of being a visiting Fulbright and SAI Scholar at Harvard Kennedy School.

Ali Cheema

Co-Founder and Board Member
Dr. Ali Cheema is a co-founder and board member at CERP. He serves as an associate professor of Economics and the faculty director of the Mahbub-ul-Haq Research Centre at the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS). Additionally, he holds the position of senior research fellow at the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). From 2004 to 2007, he also served as the head of the Economics Department at LUMS. Dr Ali possesses extensive experience in research and policy work, with a focus on political economy, governance, applied economics of crime and social protection, skills and the labor market. He was a member of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue (IPD) at Columbia University and served on the Taskforce on Decentralisation. Furthermore, he was one of the founding members of the award-winning portal Relief Information System for Earthquakes, Pakistan (RISEPAK). Dr Ali’s recent work includes conducting large-scale impact evaluations of vocational training programs aimed at poverty reduction in Punjab, as well as studying the relationship between criminal incidence and labor market outcomes in Pakistan. Dr Ali holds a Doctorate in Economics from the University of Cambridge, an MPhil in Economics and Politics of Development, a BA (Hons.) in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) from Oxford where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and a BA in Mathematics and Statistics from Government College, Lahore. In 2010-11, he had the privilege of being a visiting Fulbright and SAI Scholar at Harvard Kennedy School.

Ali Cheema

Co-Founder and Board Member
Dr. Ali Cheema is a co-founder and board member at CERP. He serves as an associate professor of Economics and the faculty director of the Mahbub-ul-Haq Research Centre at the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS). Additionally, he holds the position of senior research fellow at the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). From 2004 to 2007, he also served as the head of the Economics Department at LUMS. Dr Ali possesses extensive experience in research and policy work, with a focus on political economy, governance, applied economics of crime and social protection, skills and the labor market. He was a member of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue (IPD) at Columbia University and served on the Taskforce on Decentralisation. Furthermore, he was one of the founding members of the award-winning portal Relief Information System for Earthquakes, Pakistan (RISEPAK). Dr Ali’s recent work includes conducting large-scale impact evaluations of vocational training programs aimed at poverty reduction in Punjab, as well as studying the relationship between criminal incidence and labor market outcomes in Pakistan. Dr Ali holds a Doctorate in Economics from the University of Cambridge, an MPhil in Economics and Politics of Development, a BA (Hons.) in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) from Oxford where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and a BA in Mathematics and Statistics from Government College, Lahore. In 2010-11, he had the privilege of being a visiting Fulbright and SAI Scholar at Harvard Kennedy School.

Ali Cheema

Co-Founder and Board Member
Dr. Ali Cheema is a co-founder and board member at CERP. He serves as an associate professor of Economics and the faculty director of the Mahbub-ul-Haq Research Centre at the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS). Additionally, he holds the position of senior research fellow at the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). From 2004 to 2007, he also served as the head of the Economics Department at LUMS. Dr Ali possesses extensive experience in research and policy work, with a focus on political economy, governance, applied economics of crime and social protection, skills and the labor market. He was a member of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue (IPD) at Columbia University and served on the Taskforce on Decentralisation. Furthermore, he was one of the founding members of the award-winning portal Relief Information System for Earthquakes, Pakistan (RISEPAK). Dr Ali’s recent work includes conducting large-scale impact evaluations of vocational training programs aimed at poverty reduction in Punjab, as well as studying the relationship between criminal incidence and labor market outcomes in Pakistan. Dr Ali holds a Doctorate in Economics from the University of Cambridge, an MPhil in Economics and Politics of Development, a BA (Hons.) in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) from Oxford where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and a BA in Mathematics and Statistics from Government College, Lahore. In 2010-11, he had the privilege of being a visiting Fulbright and SAI Scholar at Harvard Kennedy School.

Ali Cheema

Co-Founder and Board Member
Dr. Ali Cheema is a co-founder and board member at CERP. He serves as an associate professor of Economics and the faculty director of the Mahbub-ul-Haq Research Centre at the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS). Additionally, he holds the position of senior research fellow at the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). From 2004 to 2007, he also served as the head of the Economics Department at LUMS. Dr Ali possesses extensive experience in research and policy work, with a focus on political economy, governance, applied economics of crime and social protection, skills and the labor market. He was a member of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue (IPD) at Columbia University and served on the Taskforce on Decentralisation. Furthermore, he was one of the founding members of the award-winning portal Relief Information System for Earthquakes, Pakistan (RISEPAK). Dr Ali’s recent work includes conducting large-scale impact evaluations of vocational training programs aimed at poverty reduction in Punjab, as well as studying the relationship between criminal incidence and labor market outcomes in Pakistan. Dr Ali holds a Doctorate in Economics from the University of Cambridge, an MPhil in Economics and Politics of Development, a BA (Hons.) in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) from Oxford where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and a BA in Mathematics and Statistics from Government College, Lahore. In 2010-11, he had the privilege of being a visiting Fulbright and SAI Scholar at Harvard Kennedy School.

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Muhammad Farooq Naseer

Research Fellow
Farooq Naseer is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is currently an Assistant Professor at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, teaching econometrics to both undergraduate and master’s students. He is also an Associate Fellow at the Institute for Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). He is a member of the Econometric Society, the European Economic Association, and the Consortium for Development Policy Research (CDPR). He has served as a member of the technical committee of experts advising Pakistan Bureau of Statistics on the design and execution of the Population Census 2017. His research interests lie in the field of education, human development and political economy including microeconometric analysis of institutions and their role in the face of information problems. His dissertation work has looked at the community-based organizations in the Philippines as well as the pricing structure in the sugarcane markets in Pakistan. His work often requires the use of empirical methods with rich micro-data from household and community surveys to study issues ranging from poverty and vocational skills to political competition and learning outcomes in schools. He is actively engaged in several research collaborations with policy impact and continues to present his work at international as well as local academic and policy forums. Within the context of his work on education, his colleagues and he has worked with private schools as well as government education departments to evaluate interventions designed to improve student learning outcomes. Dr Farooq holds a PhD and MA, both from Yale University.

Muhammad Farooq Naseer

Research Fellow
Farooq Naseer is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is currently an Assistant Professor at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, teaching econometrics to both undergraduate and master’s students. He is also an Associate Fellow at the Institute for Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). He is a member of the Econometric Society, the European Economic Association, and the Consortium for Development Policy Research (CDPR). He has served as a member of the technical committee of experts advising Pakistan Bureau of Statistics on the design and execution of the Population Census 2017. His research interests lie in the field of education, human development and political economy including microeconometric analysis of institutions and their role in the face of information problems. His dissertation work has looked at the community-based organizations in the Philippines as well as the pricing structure in the sugarcane markets in Pakistan. His work often requires the use of empirical methods with rich micro-data from household and community surveys to study issues ranging from poverty and vocational skills to political competition and learning outcomes in schools. He is actively engaged in several research collaborations with policy impact and continues to present his work at international as well as local academic and policy forums. Within the context of his work on education, his colleagues and he has worked with private schools as well as government education departments to evaluate interventions designed to improve student learning outcomes. Dr Farooq holds a PhD and MA, both from Yale University.

Muhammad Farooq Naseer

Research Fellow
Farooq Naseer is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is currently an Assistant Professor at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, teaching econometrics to both undergraduate and master’s students. He is also an Associate Fellow at the Institute for Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). He is a member of the Econometric Society, the European Economic Association, and the Consortium for Development Policy Research (CDPR). He has served as a member of the technical committee of experts advising Pakistan Bureau of Statistics on the design and execution of the Population Census 2017. His research interests lie in the field of education, human development and political economy including microeconometric analysis of institutions and their role in the face of information problems. His dissertation work has looked at the community-based organizations in the Philippines as well as the pricing structure in the sugarcane markets in Pakistan. His work often requires the use of empirical methods with rich micro-data from household and community surveys to study issues ranging from poverty and vocational skills to political competition and learning outcomes in schools. He is actively engaged in several research collaborations with policy impact and continues to present his work at international as well as local academic and policy forums. Within the context of his work on education, his colleagues and he has worked with private schools as well as government education departments to evaluate interventions designed to improve student learning outcomes. Dr Farooq holds a PhD and MA, both from Yale University.

Muhammad Farooq Naseer

Research Fellow
Farooq Naseer is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is currently an Assistant Professor at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, teaching econometrics to both undergraduate and master’s students. He is also an Associate Fellow at the Institute for Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). He is a member of the Econometric Society, the European Economic Association, and the Consortium for Development Policy Research (CDPR). He has served as a member of the technical committee of experts advising Pakistan Bureau of Statistics on the design and execution of the Population Census 2017. His research interests lie in the field of education, human development and political economy including microeconometric analysis of institutions and their role in the face of information problems. His dissertation work has looked at the community-based organizations in the Philippines as well as the pricing structure in the sugarcane markets in Pakistan. His work often requires the use of empirical methods with rich micro-data from household and community surveys to study issues ranging from poverty and vocational skills to political competition and learning outcomes in schools. He is actively engaged in several research collaborations with policy impact and continues to present his work at international as well as local academic and policy forums. Within the context of his work on education, his colleagues and he has worked with private schools as well as government education departments to evaluate interventions designed to improve student learning outcomes. Dr Farooq holds a PhD and MA, both from Yale University.

Muhammad Farooq Naseer

Research Fellow
Farooq Naseer is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is currently an Assistant Professor at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, teaching econometrics to both undergraduate and master’s students. He is also an Associate Fellow at the Institute for Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). He is a member of the Econometric Society, the European Economic Association, and the Consortium for Development Policy Research (CDPR). He has served as a member of the technical committee of experts advising Pakistan Bureau of Statistics on the design and execution of the Population Census 2017. His research interests lie in the field of education, human development and political economy including microeconometric analysis of institutions and their role in the face of information problems. His dissertation work has looked at the community-based organizations in the Philippines as well as the pricing structure in the sugarcane markets in Pakistan. His work often requires the use of empirical methods with rich micro-data from household and community surveys to study issues ranging from poverty and vocational skills to political competition and learning outcomes in schools. He is actively engaged in several research collaborations with policy impact and continues to present his work at international as well as local academic and policy forums. Within the context of his work on education, his colleagues and he has worked with private schools as well as government education departments to evaluate interventions designed to improve student learning outcomes. Dr Farooq holds a PhD and MA, both from Yale University.

Muhammad Farooq Naseer

Research Fellow
Farooq Naseer is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is currently an Assistant Professor at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, teaching econometrics to both undergraduate and master’s students. He is also an Associate Fellow at the Institute for Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). He is a member of the Econometric Society, the European Economic Association, and the Consortium for Development Policy Research (CDPR). He has served as a member of the technical committee of experts advising Pakistan Bureau of Statistics on the design and execution of the Population Census 2017. His research interests lie in the field of education, human development and political economy including microeconometric analysis of institutions and their role in the face of information problems. His dissertation work has looked at the community-based organizations in the Philippines as well as the pricing structure in the sugarcane markets in Pakistan. His work often requires the use of empirical methods with rich micro-data from household and community surveys to study issues ranging from poverty and vocational skills to political competition and learning outcomes in schools. He is actively engaged in several research collaborations with policy impact and continues to present his work at international as well as local academic and policy forums. Within the context of his work on education, his colleagues and he has worked with private schools as well as government education departments to evaluate interventions designed to improve student learning outcomes. Dr Farooq holds a PhD and MA, both from Yale University.

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Jacob Shapiro

Research Fellow
Jacob N. Shapiro is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is a Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and directs the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project. His research covers conflict, economic development, and security policy. In 2016, Dr Jacob received Karl Deutsch Award from the International Studies Association, given to a scholar younger than 40, or within 10 years of earning a PhD for his most significant contribution to the study of international relations. He is the author of The Terrorist’s Dilemma: Managing Violent Covert Organizations and co-author of Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict. He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Conflict Resolution, World Politics, and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, a Faculty Fellow of the Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS), and an Associate Fellow of the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). Dr Jacob is also a distinguished Scientist at Giant Oak, Inc. His research has been published in a broad range of academic and policy journals as well as a number of edited volumes. He has conducted field research and large-scale policy evaluations in Afghanistan, Colombia, India, and Pakistan. Dr Jacob has a PhD in Political Science and an MA in Economics from Stanford University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Michigan.

Jacob Shapiro

Research Fellow
Jacob N. Shapiro is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is a Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and directs the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project. His research covers conflict, economic development, and security policy. In 2016, Dr Jacob received Karl Deutsch Award from the International Studies Association, given to a scholar younger than 40, or within 10 years of earning a PhD for his most significant contribution to the study of international relations. He is the author of The Terrorist’s Dilemma: Managing Violent Covert Organizations and co-author of Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict. He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Conflict Resolution, World Politics, and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, a Faculty Fellow of the Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS), and an Associate Fellow of the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). Dr Jacob is also a distinguished Scientist at Giant Oak, Inc. His research has been published in a broad range of academic and policy journals as well as a number of edited volumes. He has conducted field research and large-scale policy evaluations in Afghanistan, Colombia, India, and Pakistan. Dr Jacob has a PhD in Political Science and an MA in Economics from Stanford University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Michigan.

Jacob Shapiro

Research Fellow
Jacob N. Shapiro is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is a Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and directs the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project. His research covers conflict, economic development, and security policy. In 2016, Dr Jacob received Karl Deutsch Award from the International Studies Association, given to a scholar younger than 40, or within 10 years of earning a PhD for his most significant contribution to the study of international relations. He is the author of The Terrorist’s Dilemma: Managing Violent Covert Organizations and co-author of Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict. He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Conflict Resolution, World Politics, and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, a Faculty Fellow of the Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS), and an Associate Fellow of the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). Dr Jacob is also a distinguished Scientist at Giant Oak, Inc. His research has been published in a broad range of academic and policy journals as well as a number of edited volumes. He has conducted field research and large-scale policy evaluations in Afghanistan, Colombia, India, and Pakistan. Dr Jacob has a PhD in Political Science and an MA in Economics from Stanford University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Michigan.

Jacob Shapiro

Research Fellow
Jacob N. Shapiro is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is a Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and directs the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project. His research covers conflict, economic development, and security policy. In 2016, Dr Jacob received Karl Deutsch Award from the International Studies Association, given to a scholar younger than 40, or within 10 years of earning a PhD for his most significant contribution to the study of international relations. He is the author of The Terrorist’s Dilemma: Managing Violent Covert Organizations and co-author of Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict. He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Conflict Resolution, World Politics, and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, a Faculty Fellow of the Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS), and an Associate Fellow of the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). Dr Jacob is also a distinguished Scientist at Giant Oak, Inc. His research has been published in a broad range of academic and policy journals as well as a number of edited volumes. He has conducted field research and large-scale policy evaluations in Afghanistan, Colombia, India, and Pakistan. Dr Jacob has a PhD in Political Science and an MA in Economics from Stanford University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Michigan.

Jacob Shapiro

Research Fellow
Jacob N. Shapiro is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is a Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and directs the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project. His research covers conflict, economic development, and security policy. In 2016, Dr Jacob received Karl Deutsch Award from the International Studies Association, given to a scholar younger than 40, or within 10 years of earning a PhD for his most significant contribution to the study of international relations. He is the author of The Terrorist’s Dilemma: Managing Violent Covert Organizations and co-author of Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict. He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Conflict Resolution, World Politics, and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, a Faculty Fellow of the Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS), and an Associate Fellow of the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). Dr Jacob is also a distinguished Scientist at Giant Oak, Inc. His research has been published in a broad range of academic and policy journals as well as a number of edited volumes. He has conducted field research and large-scale policy evaluations in Afghanistan, Colombia, India, and Pakistan. Dr Jacob has a PhD in Political Science and an MA in Economics from Stanford University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Michigan.

Jacob Shapiro

Research Fellow
Jacob N. Shapiro is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is a Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and directs the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project. His research covers conflict, economic development, and security policy. In 2016, Dr Jacob received Karl Deutsch Award from the International Studies Association, given to a scholar younger than 40, or within 10 years of earning a PhD for his most significant contribution to the study of international relations. He is the author of The Terrorist’s Dilemma: Managing Violent Covert Organizations and co-author of Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict. He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Conflict Resolution, World Politics, and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, a Faculty Fellow of the Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS), and an Associate Fellow of the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). Dr Jacob is also a distinguished Scientist at Giant Oak, Inc. His research has been published in a broad range of academic and policy journals as well as a number of edited volumes. He has conducted field research and large-scale policy evaluations in Afghanistan, Colombia, India, and Pakistan. Dr Jacob has a PhD in Political Science and an MA in Economics from Stanford University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Michigan.

Low-income countries are increasingly setting up welfare systems and providing economic opportunities for their citizens through cash transfer, employment generation, and skills enhancement programmes. Many of these policies are directed towards those who have been historically excluded from state programmes—the poor, rural inhabitants, and women. The success of such policies relies on these individuals being able to access the benefits provided to them. In practice, we often see “money left on the table” in that studies document how villagers do not obtain subsidised rice, widows fail to take advantage of monthly stipends, and women are unable to obtain vocational training, despite the large gains such programmes may have.

This project aims to help alleviate poverty and vulnerability by augmenting the skills-base of low income, poor and vulnerable families by improving their technical and vocational skills. The main goal is to increase the rate of income growth in poor and vulnerable households in high poverty districts of Southern Punjab – Bahawalpur, Bahawalnagar, Lodhran, and Muzaffargarh.

This project uses experimental variation to estimate the value of one such access constraint—travel that requires a woman to move outside her community. We study a skills development programme in rural Pakistan, which is representative of many underdeveloped regions throughout the world where female mobility—a widely recognised barrier to development —is a challenge for both logistical and cultural reasons.

Date:

2012 – ongoing

Funding & Implementing Partners:

Government of Punjab, Punjab Skills Development Fund (PSDF), DFID (FCDO), British Asian Trust, Kaarvan Crafts Foundation

Tags

Social Protection, Poverty, Employment, Economic Mobility, Female Empowerment, Rural Economy, Poverty Alleviation, Technical Skills, Vocational Skills, Welfare Systems, Travel, Female Mobility

Impact of Social Assistance on Early Childhood Development among Ultra-Poor Households

Principal Investigators:

Asim Ijaz Khwaja

Co-Founder and Board Member
Asim Ijaz Khwaja is a Co-Founder and Board Member at CERP. He is the Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development, Professor of International Finance and Development at the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), and the Director at the Center for International Development (CID) at HKS. Professor Asim is the former Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design (EPOD) at Harvard Kennedy School. His areas of interest include economic development, finance, education, political economy, institutions, and contract theory/mechanism design. His research combines extensive fieldwork, rigorous empirical analysis, and microeconomic theory to answer questions that are motivated by and engage with policy. He has been published in leading economics journals, such as the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and has received coverage in numerous media outlets, such as The Economist, The New York Times, the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, Al-Jazeera, BBC and CNN. Professor Asim’s recent work ranges from understanding market failures in emerging financial markets to examining the private education market in low-income countries. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He also serves as the faculty co-chair of a week-long executive education programme, “Rethinking Financial Inclusion: Smart Design for Policy and Practice,” aimed primarily at professionals involved in the design and regulation of financial products and services for low-income populations. Professor Asim received a PhD in Economics from Harvard University and BS degrees in Economics and in Mathematics with Computer Science from MIT. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He was born in London, U.K., lived for eight years in Kano, Nigeria, the next eight in Lahore, Pakistan, and for the past several years in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He continues to enjoy interacting with people around the globe.

Asim Ijaz Khwaja

Co-Founder and Board Member
Asim Ijaz Khwaja is a Co-Founder and Board Member at CERP. He is the Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development, Professor of International Finance and Development at the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), and the Director at the Center for International Development (CID) at HKS. Professor Asim is the former Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design (EPOD) at Harvard Kennedy School. His areas of interest include economic development, finance, education, political economy, institutions, and contract theory/mechanism design. His research combines extensive fieldwork, rigorous empirical analysis, and microeconomic theory to answer questions that are motivated by and engage with policy. He has been published in leading economics journals, such as the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and has received coverage in numerous media outlets, such as The Economist, The New York Times, the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, Al-Jazeera, BBC and CNN. Professor Asim’s recent work ranges from understanding market failures in emerging financial markets to examining the private education market in low-income countries. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He also serves as the faculty co-chair of a week-long executive education programme, “Rethinking Financial Inclusion: Smart Design for Policy and Practice,” aimed primarily at professionals involved in the design and regulation of financial products and services for low-income populations. Professor Asim received a PhD in Economics from Harvard University and BS degrees in Economics and in Mathematics with Computer Science from MIT. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He was born in London, U.K., lived for eight years in Kano, Nigeria, the next eight in Lahore, Pakistan, and for the past several years in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He continues to enjoy interacting with people around the globe.

Asim Ijaz Khwaja

Co-Founder and Board Member
Asim Ijaz Khwaja is a Co-Founder and Board Member at CERP. He is the Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development, Professor of International Finance and Development at the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), and the Director at the Center for International Development (CID) at HKS. Professor Asim is the former Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design (EPOD) at Harvard Kennedy School. His areas of interest include economic development, finance, education, political economy, institutions, and contract theory/mechanism design. His research combines extensive fieldwork, rigorous empirical analysis, and microeconomic theory to answer questions that are motivated by and engage with policy. He has been published in leading economics journals, such as the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and has received coverage in numerous media outlets, such as The Economist, The New York Times, the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, Al-Jazeera, BBC and CNN. Professor Asim’s recent work ranges from understanding market failures in emerging financial markets to examining the private education market in low-income countries. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He also serves as the faculty co-chair of a week-long executive education programme, “Rethinking Financial Inclusion: Smart Design for Policy and Practice,” aimed primarily at professionals involved in the design and regulation of financial products and services for low-income populations. Professor Asim received a PhD in Economics from Harvard University and BS degrees in Economics and in Mathematics with Computer Science from MIT. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He was born in London, U.K., lived for eight years in Kano, Nigeria, the next eight in Lahore, Pakistan, and for the past several years in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He continues to enjoy interacting with people around the globe.

Asim Ijaz Khwaja

Co-Founder and Board Member
Asim Ijaz Khwaja is a Co-Founder and Board Member at CERP. He is the Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development, Professor of International Finance and Development at the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), and the Director at the Center for International Development (CID) at HKS. Professor Asim is the former Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design (EPOD) at Harvard Kennedy School. His areas of interest include economic development, finance, education, political economy, institutions, and contract theory/mechanism design. His research combines extensive fieldwork, rigorous empirical analysis, and microeconomic theory to answer questions that are motivated by and engage with policy. He has been published in leading economics journals, such as the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and has received coverage in numerous media outlets, such as The Economist, The New York Times, the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, Al-Jazeera, BBC and CNN. Professor Asim’s recent work ranges from understanding market failures in emerging financial markets to examining the private education market in low-income countries. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He also serves as the faculty co-chair of a week-long executive education programme, “Rethinking Financial Inclusion: Smart Design for Policy and Practice,” aimed primarily at professionals involved in the design and regulation of financial products and services for low-income populations. Professor Asim received a PhD in Economics from Harvard University and BS degrees in Economics and in Mathematics with Computer Science from MIT. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He was born in London, U.K., lived for eight years in Kano, Nigeria, the next eight in Lahore, Pakistan, and for the past several years in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He continues to enjoy interacting with people around the globe.

Asim Ijaz Khwaja

Co-Founder and Board Member
Asim Ijaz Khwaja is a Co-Founder and Board Member at CERP. He is the Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development, Professor of International Finance and Development at the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), and the Director at the Center for International Development (CID) at HKS. Professor Asim is the former Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design (EPOD) at Harvard Kennedy School. His areas of interest include economic development, finance, education, political economy, institutions, and contract theory/mechanism design. His research combines extensive fieldwork, rigorous empirical analysis, and microeconomic theory to answer questions that are motivated by and engage with policy. He has been published in leading economics journals, such as the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and has received coverage in numerous media outlets, such as The Economist, The New York Times, the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, Al-Jazeera, BBC and CNN. Professor Asim’s recent work ranges from understanding market failures in emerging financial markets to examining the private education market in low-income countries. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He also serves as the faculty co-chair of a week-long executive education programme, “Rethinking Financial Inclusion: Smart Design for Policy and Practice,” aimed primarily at professionals involved in the design and regulation of financial products and services for low-income populations. Professor Asim received a PhD in Economics from Harvard University and BS degrees in Economics and in Mathematics with Computer Science from MIT. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He was born in London, U.K., lived for eight years in Kano, Nigeria, the next eight in Lahore, Pakistan, and for the past several years in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He continues to enjoy interacting with people around the globe.

Asim Ijaz Khwaja

Co-Founder and Board Member
Asim Ijaz Khwaja is a Co-Founder and Board Member at CERP. He is the Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development, Professor of International Finance and Development at the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), and the Director at the Center for International Development (CID) at HKS. Professor Asim is the former Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design (EPOD) at Harvard Kennedy School. His areas of interest include economic development, finance, education, political economy, institutions, and contract theory/mechanism design. His research combines extensive fieldwork, rigorous empirical analysis, and microeconomic theory to answer questions that are motivated by and engage with policy. He has been published in leading economics journals, such as the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and has received coverage in numerous media outlets, such as The Economist, The New York Times, the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, Al-Jazeera, BBC and CNN. Professor Asim’s recent work ranges from understanding market failures in emerging financial markets to examining the private education market in low-income countries. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He also serves as the faculty co-chair of a week-long executive education programme, “Rethinking Financial Inclusion: Smart Design for Policy and Practice,” aimed primarily at professionals involved in the design and regulation of financial products and services for low-income populations. Professor Asim received a PhD in Economics from Harvard University and BS degrees in Economics and in Mathematics with Computer Science from MIT. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He was born in London, U.K., lived for eight years in Kano, Nigeria, the next eight in Lahore, Pakistan, and for the past several years in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He continues to enjoy interacting with people around the globe.

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Ali Cheema

Co-Founder and Board Member
Dr. Ali Cheema is a co-founder and board member at CERP. He serves as an associate professor of Economics and the faculty director of the Mahbub-ul-Haq Research Centre at the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS). Additionally, he holds the position of senior research fellow at the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). From 2004 to 2007, he also served as the head of the Economics Department at LUMS. Dr Ali possesses extensive experience in research and policy work, with a focus on political economy, governance, applied economics of crime and social protection, skills and the labor market. He was a member of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue (IPD) at Columbia University and served on the Taskforce on Decentralisation. Furthermore, he was one of the founding members of the award-winning portal Relief Information System for Earthquakes, Pakistan (RISEPAK). Dr Ali’s recent work includes conducting large-scale impact evaluations of vocational training programs aimed at poverty reduction in Punjab, as well as studying the relationship between criminal incidence and labor market outcomes in Pakistan. Dr Ali holds a Doctorate in Economics from the University of Cambridge, an MPhil in Economics and Politics of Development, a BA (Hons.) in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) from Oxford where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and a BA in Mathematics and Statistics from Government College, Lahore. In 2010-11, he had the privilege of being a visiting Fulbright and SAI Scholar at Harvard Kennedy School.

Ali Cheema

Co-Founder and Board Member
Dr. Ali Cheema is a co-founder and board member at CERP. He serves as an associate professor of Economics and the faculty director of the Mahbub-ul-Haq Research Centre at the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS). Additionally, he holds the position of senior research fellow at the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). From 2004 to 2007, he also served as the head of the Economics Department at LUMS. Dr Ali possesses extensive experience in research and policy work, with a focus on political economy, governance, applied economics of crime and social protection, skills and the labor market. He was a member of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue (IPD) at Columbia University and served on the Taskforce on Decentralisation. Furthermore, he was one of the founding members of the award-winning portal Relief Information System for Earthquakes, Pakistan (RISEPAK). Dr Ali’s recent work includes conducting large-scale impact evaluations of vocational training programs aimed at poverty reduction in Punjab, as well as studying the relationship between criminal incidence and labor market outcomes in Pakistan. Dr Ali holds a Doctorate in Economics from the University of Cambridge, an MPhil in Economics and Politics of Development, a BA (Hons.) in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) from Oxford where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and a BA in Mathematics and Statistics from Government College, Lahore. In 2010-11, he had the privilege of being a visiting Fulbright and SAI Scholar at Harvard Kennedy School.

Ali Cheema

Co-Founder and Board Member
Dr. Ali Cheema is a co-founder and board member at CERP. He serves as an associate professor of Economics and the faculty director of the Mahbub-ul-Haq Research Centre at the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS). Additionally, he holds the position of senior research fellow at the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). From 2004 to 2007, he also served as the head of the Economics Department at LUMS. Dr Ali possesses extensive experience in research and policy work, with a focus on political economy, governance, applied economics of crime and social protection, skills and the labor market. He was a member of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue (IPD) at Columbia University and served on the Taskforce on Decentralisation. Furthermore, he was one of the founding members of the award-winning portal Relief Information System for Earthquakes, Pakistan (RISEPAK). Dr Ali’s recent work includes conducting large-scale impact evaluations of vocational training programs aimed at poverty reduction in Punjab, as well as studying the relationship between criminal incidence and labor market outcomes in Pakistan. Dr Ali holds a Doctorate in Economics from the University of Cambridge, an MPhil in Economics and Politics of Development, a BA (Hons.) in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) from Oxford where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and a BA in Mathematics and Statistics from Government College, Lahore. In 2010-11, he had the privilege of being a visiting Fulbright and SAI Scholar at Harvard Kennedy School.

Ali Cheema

Co-Founder and Board Member
Dr. Ali Cheema is a co-founder and board member at CERP. He serves as an associate professor of Economics and the faculty director of the Mahbub-ul-Haq Research Centre at the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS). Additionally, he holds the position of senior research fellow at the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). From 2004 to 2007, he also served as the head of the Economics Department at LUMS. Dr Ali possesses extensive experience in research and policy work, with a focus on political economy, governance, applied economics of crime and social protection, skills and the labor market. He was a member of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue (IPD) at Columbia University and served on the Taskforce on Decentralisation. Furthermore, he was one of the founding members of the award-winning portal Relief Information System for Earthquakes, Pakistan (RISEPAK). Dr Ali’s recent work includes conducting large-scale impact evaluations of vocational training programs aimed at poverty reduction in Punjab, as well as studying the relationship between criminal incidence and labor market outcomes in Pakistan. Dr Ali holds a Doctorate in Economics from the University of Cambridge, an MPhil in Economics and Politics of Development, a BA (Hons.) in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) from Oxford where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and a BA in Mathematics and Statistics from Government College, Lahore. In 2010-11, he had the privilege of being a visiting Fulbright and SAI Scholar at Harvard Kennedy School.

Ali Cheema

Co-Founder and Board Member
Dr. Ali Cheema is a co-founder and board member at CERP. He serves as an associate professor of Economics and the faculty director of the Mahbub-ul-Haq Research Centre at the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS). Additionally, he holds the position of senior research fellow at the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). From 2004 to 2007, he also served as the head of the Economics Department at LUMS. Dr Ali possesses extensive experience in research and policy work, with a focus on political economy, governance, applied economics of crime and social protection, skills and the labor market. He was a member of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue (IPD) at Columbia University and served on the Taskforce on Decentralisation. Furthermore, he was one of the founding members of the award-winning portal Relief Information System for Earthquakes, Pakistan (RISEPAK). Dr Ali’s recent work includes conducting large-scale impact evaluations of vocational training programs aimed at poverty reduction in Punjab, as well as studying the relationship between criminal incidence and labor market outcomes in Pakistan. Dr Ali holds a Doctorate in Economics from the University of Cambridge, an MPhil in Economics and Politics of Development, a BA (Hons.) in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) from Oxford where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and a BA in Mathematics and Statistics from Government College, Lahore. In 2010-11, he had the privilege of being a visiting Fulbright and SAI Scholar at Harvard Kennedy School.

Ali Cheema

Co-Founder and Board Member
Dr. Ali Cheema is a co-founder and board member at CERP. He serves as an associate professor of Economics and the faculty director of the Mahbub-ul-Haq Research Centre at the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS). Additionally, he holds the position of senior research fellow at the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). From 2004 to 2007, he also served as the head of the Economics Department at LUMS. Dr Ali possesses extensive experience in research and policy work, with a focus on political economy, governance, applied economics of crime and social protection, skills and the labor market. He was a member of the Initiative for Policy Dialogue (IPD) at Columbia University and served on the Taskforce on Decentralisation. Furthermore, he was one of the founding members of the award-winning portal Relief Information System for Earthquakes, Pakistan (RISEPAK). Dr Ali’s recent work includes conducting large-scale impact evaluations of vocational training programs aimed at poverty reduction in Punjab, as well as studying the relationship between criminal incidence and labor market outcomes in Pakistan. Dr Ali holds a Doctorate in Economics from the University of Cambridge, an MPhil in Economics and Politics of Development, a BA (Hons.) in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics (PPE) from Oxford where he was a Rhodes Scholar, and a BA in Mathematics and Statistics from Government College, Lahore. In 2010-11, he had the privilege of being a visiting Fulbright and SAI Scholar at Harvard Kennedy School.

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Muhammad Farooq Naseer

Research Fellow
Farooq Naseer is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is currently an Assistant Professor at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, teaching econometrics to both undergraduate and master’s students. He is also an Associate Fellow at the Institute for Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). He is a member of the Econometric Society, the European Economic Association, and the Consortium for Development Policy Research (CDPR). He has served as a member of the technical committee of experts advising Pakistan Bureau of Statistics on the design and execution of the Population Census 2017. His research interests lie in the field of education, human development and political economy including microeconometric analysis of institutions and their role in the face of information problems. His dissertation work has looked at the community-based organizations in the Philippines as well as the pricing structure in the sugarcane markets in Pakistan. His work often requires the use of empirical methods with rich micro-data from household and community surveys to study issues ranging from poverty and vocational skills to political competition and learning outcomes in schools. He is actively engaged in several research collaborations with policy impact and continues to present his work at international as well as local academic and policy forums. Within the context of his work on education, his colleagues and he has worked with private schools as well as government education departments to evaluate interventions designed to improve student learning outcomes. Dr Farooq holds a PhD and MA, both from Yale University.

Muhammad Farooq Naseer

Research Fellow
Farooq Naseer is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is currently an Assistant Professor at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, teaching econometrics to both undergraduate and master’s students. He is also an Associate Fellow at the Institute for Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). He is a member of the Econometric Society, the European Economic Association, and the Consortium for Development Policy Research (CDPR). He has served as a member of the technical committee of experts advising Pakistan Bureau of Statistics on the design and execution of the Population Census 2017. His research interests lie in the field of education, human development and political economy including microeconometric analysis of institutions and their role in the face of information problems. His dissertation work has looked at the community-based organizations in the Philippines as well as the pricing structure in the sugarcane markets in Pakistan. His work often requires the use of empirical methods with rich micro-data from household and community surveys to study issues ranging from poverty and vocational skills to political competition and learning outcomes in schools. He is actively engaged in several research collaborations with policy impact and continues to present his work at international as well as local academic and policy forums. Within the context of his work on education, his colleagues and he has worked with private schools as well as government education departments to evaluate interventions designed to improve student learning outcomes. Dr Farooq holds a PhD and MA, both from Yale University.

Muhammad Farooq Naseer

Research Fellow
Farooq Naseer is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is currently an Assistant Professor at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, teaching econometrics to both undergraduate and master’s students. He is also an Associate Fellow at the Institute for Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). He is a member of the Econometric Society, the European Economic Association, and the Consortium for Development Policy Research (CDPR). He has served as a member of the technical committee of experts advising Pakistan Bureau of Statistics on the design and execution of the Population Census 2017. His research interests lie in the field of education, human development and political economy including microeconometric analysis of institutions and their role in the face of information problems. His dissertation work has looked at the community-based organizations in the Philippines as well as the pricing structure in the sugarcane markets in Pakistan. His work often requires the use of empirical methods with rich micro-data from household and community surveys to study issues ranging from poverty and vocational skills to political competition and learning outcomes in schools. He is actively engaged in several research collaborations with policy impact and continues to present his work at international as well as local academic and policy forums. Within the context of his work on education, his colleagues and he has worked with private schools as well as government education departments to evaluate interventions designed to improve student learning outcomes. Dr Farooq holds a PhD and MA, both from Yale University.

Muhammad Farooq Naseer

Research Fellow
Farooq Naseer is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is currently an Assistant Professor at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, teaching econometrics to both undergraduate and master’s students. He is also an Associate Fellow at the Institute for Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). He is a member of the Econometric Society, the European Economic Association, and the Consortium for Development Policy Research (CDPR). He has served as a member of the technical committee of experts advising Pakistan Bureau of Statistics on the design and execution of the Population Census 2017. His research interests lie in the field of education, human development and political economy including microeconometric analysis of institutions and their role in the face of information problems. His dissertation work has looked at the community-based organizations in the Philippines as well as the pricing structure in the sugarcane markets in Pakistan. His work often requires the use of empirical methods with rich micro-data from household and community surveys to study issues ranging from poverty and vocational skills to political competition and learning outcomes in schools. He is actively engaged in several research collaborations with policy impact and continues to present his work at international as well as local academic and policy forums. Within the context of his work on education, his colleagues and he has worked with private schools as well as government education departments to evaluate interventions designed to improve student learning outcomes. Dr Farooq holds a PhD and MA, both from Yale University.

Muhammad Farooq Naseer

Research Fellow
Farooq Naseer is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is currently an Assistant Professor at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, teaching econometrics to both undergraduate and master’s students. He is also an Associate Fellow at the Institute for Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). He is a member of the Econometric Society, the European Economic Association, and the Consortium for Development Policy Research (CDPR). He has served as a member of the technical committee of experts advising Pakistan Bureau of Statistics on the design and execution of the Population Census 2017. His research interests lie in the field of education, human development and political economy including microeconometric analysis of institutions and their role in the face of information problems. His dissertation work has looked at the community-based organizations in the Philippines as well as the pricing structure in the sugarcane markets in Pakistan. His work often requires the use of empirical methods with rich micro-data from household and community surveys to study issues ranging from poverty and vocational skills to political competition and learning outcomes in schools. He is actively engaged in several research collaborations with policy impact and continues to present his work at international as well as local academic and policy forums. Within the context of his work on education, his colleagues and he has worked with private schools as well as government education departments to evaluate interventions designed to improve student learning outcomes. Dr Farooq holds a PhD and MA, both from Yale University.

Muhammad Farooq Naseer

Research Fellow
Farooq Naseer is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is currently an Assistant Professor at the Lahore University of Management Sciences, teaching econometrics to both undergraduate and master’s students. He is also an Associate Fellow at the Institute for Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). He is a member of the Econometric Society, the European Economic Association, and the Consortium for Development Policy Research (CDPR). He has served as a member of the technical committee of experts advising Pakistan Bureau of Statistics on the design and execution of the Population Census 2017. His research interests lie in the field of education, human development and political economy including microeconometric analysis of institutions and their role in the face of information problems. His dissertation work has looked at the community-based organizations in the Philippines as well as the pricing structure in the sugarcane markets in Pakistan. His work often requires the use of empirical methods with rich micro-data from household and community surveys to study issues ranging from poverty and vocational skills to political competition and learning outcomes in schools. He is actively engaged in several research collaborations with policy impact and continues to present his work at international as well as local academic and policy forums. Within the context of his work on education, his colleagues and he has worked with private schools as well as government education departments to evaluate interventions designed to improve student learning outcomes. Dr Farooq holds a PhD and MA, both from Yale University.

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Jacob Shapiro

Research Fellow
Jacob N. Shapiro is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is a Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and directs the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project. His research covers conflict, economic development, and security policy. In 2016, Dr Jacob received Karl Deutsch Award from the International Studies Association, given to a scholar younger than 40, or within 10 years of earning a PhD for his most significant contribution to the study of international relations. He is the author of The Terrorist’s Dilemma: Managing Violent Covert Organizations and co-author of Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict. He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Conflict Resolution, World Politics, and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, a Faculty Fellow of the Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS), and an Associate Fellow of the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). Dr Jacob is also a distinguished Scientist at Giant Oak, Inc. His research has been published in a broad range of academic and policy journals as well as a number of edited volumes. He has conducted field research and large-scale policy evaluations in Afghanistan, Colombia, India, and Pakistan. Dr Jacob has a PhD in Political Science and an MA in Economics from Stanford University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Michigan.

Jacob Shapiro

Research Fellow
Jacob N. Shapiro is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is a Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and directs the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project. His research covers conflict, economic development, and security policy. In 2016, Dr Jacob received Karl Deutsch Award from the International Studies Association, given to a scholar younger than 40, or within 10 years of earning a PhD for his most significant contribution to the study of international relations. He is the author of The Terrorist’s Dilemma: Managing Violent Covert Organizations and co-author of Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict. He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Conflict Resolution, World Politics, and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, a Faculty Fellow of the Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS), and an Associate Fellow of the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). Dr Jacob is also a distinguished Scientist at Giant Oak, Inc. His research has been published in a broad range of academic and policy journals as well as a number of edited volumes. He has conducted field research and large-scale policy evaluations in Afghanistan, Colombia, India, and Pakistan. Dr Jacob has a PhD in Political Science and an MA in Economics from Stanford University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Michigan.

Jacob Shapiro

Research Fellow
Jacob N. Shapiro is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is a Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and directs the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project. His research covers conflict, economic development, and security policy. In 2016, Dr Jacob received Karl Deutsch Award from the International Studies Association, given to a scholar younger than 40, or within 10 years of earning a PhD for his most significant contribution to the study of international relations. He is the author of The Terrorist’s Dilemma: Managing Violent Covert Organizations and co-author of Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict. He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Conflict Resolution, World Politics, and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, a Faculty Fellow of the Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS), and an Associate Fellow of the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). Dr Jacob is also a distinguished Scientist at Giant Oak, Inc. His research has been published in a broad range of academic and policy journals as well as a number of edited volumes. He has conducted field research and large-scale policy evaluations in Afghanistan, Colombia, India, and Pakistan. Dr Jacob has a PhD in Political Science and an MA in Economics from Stanford University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Michigan.

Jacob Shapiro

Research Fellow
Jacob N. Shapiro is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is a Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and directs the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project. His research covers conflict, economic development, and security policy. In 2016, Dr Jacob received Karl Deutsch Award from the International Studies Association, given to a scholar younger than 40, or within 10 years of earning a PhD for his most significant contribution to the study of international relations. He is the author of The Terrorist’s Dilemma: Managing Violent Covert Organizations and co-author of Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict. He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Conflict Resolution, World Politics, and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, a Faculty Fellow of the Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS), and an Associate Fellow of the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). Dr Jacob is also a distinguished Scientist at Giant Oak, Inc. His research has been published in a broad range of academic and policy journals as well as a number of edited volumes. He has conducted field research and large-scale policy evaluations in Afghanistan, Colombia, India, and Pakistan. Dr Jacob has a PhD in Political Science and an MA in Economics from Stanford University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Michigan.

Jacob Shapiro

Research Fellow
Jacob N. Shapiro is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is a Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and directs the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project. His research covers conflict, economic development, and security policy. In 2016, Dr Jacob received Karl Deutsch Award from the International Studies Association, given to a scholar younger than 40, or within 10 years of earning a PhD for his most significant contribution to the study of international relations. He is the author of The Terrorist’s Dilemma: Managing Violent Covert Organizations and co-author of Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict. He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Conflict Resolution, World Politics, and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, a Faculty Fellow of the Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS), and an Associate Fellow of the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). Dr Jacob is also a distinguished Scientist at Giant Oak, Inc. His research has been published in a broad range of academic and policy journals as well as a number of edited volumes. He has conducted field research and large-scale policy evaluations in Afghanistan, Colombia, India, and Pakistan. Dr Jacob has a PhD in Political Science and an MA in Economics from Stanford University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Michigan.

Jacob Shapiro

Research Fellow
Jacob N. Shapiro is a Research Fellow at CERP. He is a Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and directs the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project. His research covers conflict, economic development, and security policy. In 2016, Dr Jacob received Karl Deutsch Award from the International Studies Association, given to a scholar younger than 40, or within 10 years of earning a PhD for his most significant contribution to the study of international relations. He is the author of The Terrorist’s Dilemma: Managing Violent Covert Organizations and co-author of Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict. He is an Associate Editor of Journal of Conflict Resolution, World Politics, and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, a Faculty Fellow of the Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS), and an Associate Fellow of the Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS). Dr Jacob is also a distinguished Scientist at Giant Oak, Inc. His research has been published in a broad range of academic and policy journals as well as a number of edited volumes. He has conducted field research and large-scale policy evaluations in Afghanistan, Colombia, India, and Pakistan. Dr Jacob has a PhD in Political Science and an MA in Economics from Stanford University, and a BA in Political Science from the University of Michigan.

The project will in particular use and build on an earlier randomised control trial intervention (part of CERP’s Asset Transfer project) targeted at the poorest households in rural Punjab, Pakistan. In 2014, households were randomly assigned to either receive asset transfers (typically in the form of livestock) or the equivalent unconditional cash transfer. In the subsequent eight years, both forms of social assistance are documented to have substantial impacts on the labour market activities, earnings and investments of treated households.

This project will investigate how each form of social assistance impacted children’s outcomes, for those born prior, during or just after the original intervention. A range of child outcomes will be studied, and measures of cognitive and non-cognitive development for children between the ages of 0-8 years. We will also collect information to identify the mechanisms generating child development outcomes, such as parental beliefs and attitudes. This data will be collected from a sample of ultra-poor households residing in the four Project Districts: Bahawalpur, Bahawalnagar, Muzaffargarh and Lodhran.

Three different child development tools (the IDEALA tool for children aged 48 months – 7 years 11 months 30 days, Liz Spelke’s tasks for children aged 36 months – 7 years 11 months 30 days and a brief child development assessment for children aged 6-35 months 30 days) will be used along with a section on mother or primary caregiver’s physical and mental health to measure outcomes at different stages of child development.

The IDELA is an internationally validated tool which has already been used by multiple research teams in Pakistan (https://idela-network.org/about/). All tests are direct assessments except the CREDI which exclusively relies on mother or primary caregiver reports, and thus, primarily focuses on milestones and behaviours that are easy for mothers or primary caregivers to understand, observe, and describe. Interviewers will conduct the surveys with children in the respondents’ homes and the mothers/caregivers will be present at all times during the interview.

Date:

2020-Ongoing

Funding & Implementing Partners:

3IE, Yale University

Tags

Early Childhood Development, Social Assistance, Social Protection, Poverty

Market for Tutors Project

Principal Investigators:

Asim Ijaz Khwaja

Co-Founder and Board Member
Asim Ijaz Khwaja is a Co-Founder and Board Member at CERP. He is the Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development, Professor of International Finance and Development at the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS), and the Director at the Center for International Development (CID) at HKS. Professor Asim is the former Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design (EPOD) at Harvard Kennedy School. His areas of interest include economic development, finance, education, political economy, institutions, and contract theory/mechanism design. His research combines extensive fieldwork, rigorous empirical analysis, and microeconomic theory to answer questions that are motivated by and engage with policy. He has been published in leading economics journals, such as the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and has received coverage in numerous media outlets, such as The Economist, The New York Times, the Washington Post, the International Herald Tribune, Al-Jazeera, BBC and CNN. Professor Asim’s recent work ranges from understanding market failures in emerging financial markets to examining the private education market in low-income countries. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He also serves as the faculty co-chair of a week-long executive education programme, “Rethinking Financial Inclusion: Smart Design for Policy and Practice,” aimed primarily at professionals involved in the design and regulation of financial products and services for low-income populations. Professor Asim received a PhD in Economics from Harvard University and BS degrees in Economics and in Mathematics with Computer Science from MIT. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. He was born in London, U.K., lived for eight years in Kano, Nigeria, the next eight in Lahore, Pakistan, and for the past several years in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He continues to enjoy interacting with people around the globe.

Asim Ijaz Khwaja

Co-Founder and Board Member